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Computer Support for Mathematical Word Problem Solving: guided by Thai Teachers' Views

  • 23 Apr 2010
  • 2:00 PM - 3:59 PM
  • Dal Faculty of Computer Science

Faculty of Computer Science

6050 University Avenue

Dalhousie University

Halifax, NS

 

                       FCS SEMINAR

 

Speaker:   Nick Cercone

           York University

 

Titles:     Computer Support for Mathematical Word Problem Solving:

guided by Thai Teachers' Views

 

**AND**:   Thai Visually Impaired 'S Requirements to Access Mathematics

via an Automatic Math Reader

 

Date:      Friday April 23, 2010

 

Time:      2:00 p.m.

 

Location:  Jacob Slonim Conference Room (430)

           6050 University Ave., Halifax

 

Note:      Coffee and cookies will be provided, courtesy of Faculty of

           Computer Science.

 

Computer Support for Mathematical Word Problem Solving: guided by Thai Teachers' Views

 

Abstract: This study investigates Thai teachers’ views concerning mathematical word problem teaching and learning in the classroom, and the implementation of technology to enhance teaching and learning mathematical word problems. Data were collected by using of a semi-structured interviews administered to 24 mathematics teachers. The result of this study showed that the students’ major difficulty in solving mathematical word problem lies in the understanding of the problem and translating the problem into equations. Therefore, the teachers’ suggestions led to the design of a tool to help improve students’ performance in solving mathematical word problem.

 

Thai Visually Impaired 'S Requirements to Access Mathematics via an Automatic Math Reader

 

Abstract: We present the requirements to access mathematics for Thai visually impaired students. Blind and visually impaired (VI) students agreed to participate in an interview to determine the requirements for using a text–to–speech (TTS) system with the capability to automatically read math expressions. The interviewconsisted of two parts: the students’ background characteristics and the students’ difficulties in andrequirements for using TTS systems to read math expressions. Our results show that the students who are blind and visually impaired had difficulties to access mathematics. The students have basic computer skills with standard software e.g., Microsoft Word. Therefore, the findings suggest that the students desire assistive technology to better access to mathematics.

 

Speaker URL:

http://www.cse.yorku.ca/cspeople/faculty/nick/

 

Host contact: Evangelos Milios eem@cs.dal.ca

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